Sunday, June 27, 2010

Seasonal Recycling

Every year, just before the beginning of summer, I spend a few weeks recycling a few 100 pounds of studio slop into clay for a spot of R&D.

Now while this process of recycling takes 5 or 6 weeks just to turn all of the buckets of slop into usable clay... clay that's a bit too touchy for small delicate work but weird and wonderful enough to use learning to play "big".
(Take special notice of the small "b". The studio kiln's new "Half Pint" status limits in-house fired wares to 18"... soooooo, 18 inches is this summers limit.) Luckily... when I dream, this is the size perfect for Crown Pots!


Ahhhh! A Glorious mess!


This time I needed to see how a few small ideas would scale-up while. I thought this might be a good time to get a handle on how long it takes to push a small series of (8) ten pound canisters through the studio. This included wedging everything, cutting a fresh new library of stencils, throwing, trimming, blocking in, and finishing the greenware.
Actually...

Even with a plan and practice, it took a fair amount of time to shepherd the batch of greenware through to bone dry. This ended up averaging about 4 hours spent working on each piece.

It's not exactly a walk to Egypt...
but I can live with that... it is an investment of time.
And I like what I see...

7 comments:

cookingwithgas said...

they make mighty fine "crown pots"!
are you planning for a new kiln- or dreaming of one?

FetishGhost said...

Dreaming and planning...

jim said...

hi joel, i like what i see too... i totally dig the stepped transition from one section to the next. the first shot of the clay looks like one of those deli meats i will not eat... mortadella or olive loaf or something like that.

Anonymous said...

Yes, i thought it was lunchmeat too!
Keep up the great blog and pots!
-Pinglo

ang said...

very cool! love your designs, the curves are just right i guess thats practise...

Kitoi said...

The first photo reminds me of spam

Michael Kline said...

My German mother always has meats that look like that loaf of clay for sandwiches. Nothing is wasted when it comes to the Germans and their wurst!
Yum.