Sunday, January 17, 2010

RubbleRubble…

You show your age a bit if that title makes you hungry for a hamburger… No explanation though, just snickers… but this post isn’t about thoughts of another missed lunch… this is about opening the kiln on a rushed load of bowls and finding the telltale signs of… well a rushed load of bowls pushed through the bisque kiln. We all know what happens, but after a while, some of us begin to wonder whether the work needs to actually be completely bone dry or how dry does the work actually need to be to survive a bisque… even a slow bisque.

RubbleRubble…

I don’t think it’s as bad as all of that. I’m only seeing only one bowl with a foot efficiently reduced to grog, but that’s just the top shelf and I haven’t even started unloading yet.

RubbleRubble…

10 comments:

Sue Pariseau Pottery said...

Hamburglar - :) Too bad about the bisque, we all need that kind of reminder every now and then.

Kitoi said...

Haste makes waste....it's happened to me a few times.

Kari Weaver Hopkins said...

We all need that slap every now and again. For me it happens when I try to dry pieces too quickly, cracks, cracks and more cracks.

FetishGhost said...

Haste does make waste... I do need the slap again every now and then. Maybe I should finally get serious about setting up a drying cabinet.

claydancer said...

I hate it when that happens. I just went through my photo files and deleted a bunch of pictures of bisque blow ups. Patience is a virtue. Haha

jimgottuso said...

drag about the rushed bisque... lately because of my computerized controller, if i'm unsure, i have a little profile that takes the kiln up to 190 degrees and holds if for an hour. then i just load the regular profile for the bisque and go.

Amanda said...

If I'm the least bit unsure about a bisque, I candle at 200° for 8 hours. I just start a little earlier than normal, and since I usually have to program a 4-5 hour delay so the kiln will peak when I get back in the morning, I can just start right back up.

Haven't lost a one since I started. And I've put some pieces in that were flat out damp.

ginkgo said...

glups ... when my studio is so cold in winter...i always have that problem to dry my pieces and wait and wait ...it is tiring to wait so much until it is ok but accident may happens one time or another ....snif :(

Jesse Lu said...

Hey, congrats on being featured on the etsy blog the other day...

http://www.etsy.com/storque/spotlight/etsy-finds-organization-nation-6814/

HeidiMCF said...

Don't ya love that? Hopefully that was the only one.